Stranger in Moscow: un lamento

Stranger in Moscow..un lamento.

Por Gisela Conte de Gisela Conte Soriano, el Viernes, 08 de julio de 2011 a las 13:11

Tengo dias escuchando repetidamente el tema de Michael “Stranger in Moscow” en mi iPod mientras voy manejando de casa al trabajo y viceversa.

No hay una vez que al escuchar esta cancion, no se me forme un nudo en la garganta ! Es inevitable! Para mi es una de las canciones “personales” de Michael mas desgarradoras que el haya hecho, si nos ponemos a pensar en el contexto bajo la cual fue escrita y el mensaje que Michael en ella nos deja.

Imagino bajo esas circunstancias terribles de 1993 , estando de gira en Moscu durante el Dangerous Tour, solo en su habitacion de hotel, triste, angustiado, desesperado ante las noticias que le llegaban desde su propio pais.

Esta cancion es un lamento, un grito a la soledad y desilusion.

Para aquellos que no la conozcan , aca les dejo la traduccion al español . Luego les agregare informacion adicional tomada de Wikipedia donde se mencionan las circunstancias de esos terribles momentos por los que Michael pasaba cuando el escribio lo que en un principio fue un poema y luego convirtio en la cancion.

Simplemente para mi es una de las mas hermosas y a la vez tristes canciones que hiciera Michael…un canto, un lamento al mundo que reflejo su soledad y tristeza…

Aca va la letra en ingles :

I was wandering in the rain

Mask of life, feelin’ insane

Swift and sudden fall from grace

Sunny days seem far away

Kremlin’s shadow belittlin’ me

Stalin’s tomb won’t let me be

On and on and on it came

Wish the rain would just let me

How does it feel (How does it feel)

How does it feel

How does it feel

When you’re alone

And you’re cold inside

Here abandoned in my fame

Armageddon of the brain

KGB was stalkin me

Take my name and just let me be

Then a begger boy called my name

Happy days will drown the pain

On and on and on it came

And again, and again, and again…

Take my name and just let me be

How does it feel (How does it feel)

How does it feel

How does it feel

How does it feel

How does it feel (How does it feel now)

How does it feel

How does it feel

When you’re alone

And you’re cold inside

How does it feel (How does it feel)

How does it feel

How does it feel

How does it feel

How does it feel (How does it feel now)

How does it feel

How does it feel

When you’re alone

And you’re cold inside

Like stranger in Moscow

Like stranger in Moscow

We’re talkin’ danger

We’re talkin’ danger, baby

Like stranger in Moscow

We’re talkin’ danger

We’re talkin’ danger, baby

Like stranger in Moscow

I’m livin’ lonely

I’m livin’ lonely, baby

Stranger in Moscow

(KGB interrogator –

Russian to English Translation)

“Why have you come from the West?

Confess! To steal the great achievements of

the people, the accomplishments of the workers…”

Y aqui la traduccion al español :

Extraño en Moscú Voy vagando por la lluvia.

Como en una vida imaginaria, creia estar loco.

Esa rápida y repentina caída en la desgracia,

los días soleados parecen estar muy lejos.

La sombra del Kremlin me hace parecer más pequeño,

el mausoleo de Stalin no me soltaba,

me perseguía una y otra vez.

Quisiera que la lluvia me dejara en paz.

¿Como se siente? (¿Como se siente?)

¿Como se siente? ¿Como se siente?

Cuando se está solo y sólo se siente frío en el interior.

Estoy abandonado aquí, en mi fama,

armado sólo con mi cerebro.

La KGB me perseguía.

Apunta mi nombre y déjame en paz.

Entonces, un chico mendigo gritó mi nombre.

Los días felices borrarán el dolor.

Una y otra vez se me echaba encima.

Otra vez, y otra vez, y otra vez ..

Apunta mi nombre y déjame en paz.

¿Como se siente? ¿(Como se siente)?

¿Como se siente? ¿Como se siente?

¿Como se siente? ¿(Como se siente)?

¿Como se siente? ¿Como se siente?

Y sólo se siente frío en el interior.

¿Como se siente? ¿(Como se siente)?

¿Como se siente? ¿Como se siente?

¿Como se siente? ¿(Como se siente)?

¿Como se siente? ¿Como se siente?

Cuando se está solo y sólo se siente frío en el interior.

Como un extraño en Moscú,

como un extraño en Moscú.

Aquí existe el peligro.

Aquí existe el peligro, cariño.

Como un extraño en Moscú.

Aquí existe el peligro.

Aquí existe el peligro, cariño

Como un extraño en Moscú.

Vivo muy solo, vivo muy solo, cariño. Un extraño en Moscú.

 Agrego ciertos datos mas From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

“Stranger in Moscow” Single by Michael Jacksonfrom the album HIStory: Past,

Present and Future, Book IReleasedNovember 4, 1996 (Worldwide) August 28,

1997 (U.S.) FormatCD single, 7″, 12″ Recorded1993-1994 GenrePop, Rhythm and

blues, blues,Gospel Length5:44 (album version) 4:05 (radio edit) 5:55 (extended

version) LabelEpic Records Writer(s)Michael Jackson ProducerMichael Jackson

Michael Jackson singles chronology”They Don’t Care About Us” (1996) “Stranger

in Moscow” (1996) “Blood on the Dance Floor” (1997) HIStory Continues track

listing”They Don’t Care About Us” (2) “Stranger in Moscow” (3) “This Time

Around” “Stranger in Moscow” is the fifth and final single from Michael Jackson’s

album HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I.

The song was released worldwide in November 1996 but was not released in the

United States until August 1997. The track was written by Jackson in 1993, at the

height of the highly publicized child abuse accusations made against him, while

on tour in Moscow. During his visit to Moscow in September, Jackson came up

with the song “Stranger in Moscow” which would be released on his 1995 album

HIStory.

It was during a time when Jackson felt very alone, far away from his family and

friends, yet every night throughout his tours fans would stay by his hotel and

support him. The song’s music video depicts the lives of six individuals,

including Jackson, who are left isolated and disconnected from the world around

them.

The imagery in the video has been replicated in television adverts. Upon its

initial release, and years later after the singer’s death, the song has garnered

some of the best critical praise of Jackson’s career. Many former collaborators

and critics have gone so far as to say it is Jackson’s best song. In the book, The

Many Faces of Michael Jackson, author Lee Pinkerton, like many other

reviewers, noted that HIStory’s album tracks like “Stranger in Moscow”, were

Jackson’s response to recent events in his personal life. In 1993, the relationship

between Jackson and the press soured entirely when he was accused of child

sexual abuse. Although never charged with a crime, Jackson was subject to

intense media scrutiny while the criminal investigation took place. Complaints

about the coverage and media included using sensational headlines

to draw in readers and viewers when the content itself did not

support the headline, accepting stories of Jackson’s alleged criminal activity

in return for money, accepting leaked material from the police investigation in

return for money paid, deliberately using pictures of Jackson’s appearance at its

worst, a lack of objectivity and using headlines that strongly implied Jackson’s

guilt.

“Stranger in Moscow” is an R&B ballad penned by Jackson in 1993, during his

Dangerous World Tour in Moscow. It was originally written as a poem by

Jackson, then it was adapted into a song. A background guitar was played by

Steve Lukather while keyboards, synthesizers and bass are credited to David

Paich and Steve Porcaro. Originally, HIStory was planned as a greatest hits

release, with a few new tracks. However, Jackson and his collaborators were so

pleased with the result of “Stranger in Moscow” that they decided to giveHIStory

a full studio album as the second disc. Jackson used elements of Russian imagery

and symbolism to help promote the concept of fear and alienation in the track, in

a similar fashion to Simply Red’s album Love and the Russian Winter several

years later. It concludes with a narrative, spoken in Russian, by a KGB

interrogator. The narrative, translated into English is, “Why have you come from

the west? Confess! To steal the great achievements of the people, the

accomplishments of the workers…”

The song’s music video, directed by Nick Brandt, and shot in Los Angeles, is

focused around six unrelated people living in a cityscape while the rest of the

world moves around them in slow motion. The first half of the video introduces

these figures. They are a man looking down at the city from his bedroom window,

a woman sitting alone in a coffee shop, a homeless man lying on the damp street,

a lone figure feeding pigeons, a boy ostracized from a game of baseball, and

Jackson himself is the sixth figure, seen walking the city streets.

Special effects are used to show birds and wasps flying, glass breaking and coffee

spilling, all in slow motion. In the second half of the scenario, heavy rain

descends on the city and the citizens try to flee, all again seen in slow motion.

From the safety of shelter, the six “strangers” watch everyone’s futile attempts to

avoid the sudden change in weather. Eventually they decide to go outside, where

they look up at the sky and allow the rain to soak them. The video ends with

Michael whipping his hair. During this scene, you hear a voice speaking softly in

Russian, a reference to Moscow. Jackson’s biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli, has

stated that the video is based on Jackson’s real life. The singer used to walk alone

at night looking for new friends, even at the peak of his musical popularity. The

1980s saw the singer become deeply unhappy; Jackson explained, “Even at

home, I’m lonely. I sit in my room sometimes and cry. It’s so hard to make

friends …I sometimes walk around the neighborhood at night, just hoping to find

someone to talk to. But I just end up coming home”.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stranger_in_Moscow

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